Islands of Scotland

From DocuWiki

Jump to: navigation, search


[edit] General Information

Nature Documentary hosted by John Carmichael and published by Others in 2005 - English, Gaelic (Scottish) Multilanguage narration

also known as

[edit] Cover

Image: Islands-of-Scotland-Cover.jpg

[edit] Information

Over six distinct journeys, marvel at the staggering beauty of Scotland's islands from the air. The latest in challenging aerial photography technology shows the islands in a dramatic new light, from some of the remotest islands in the UK, to some that are within easy reach of Scotland's mainland cities. This stunning television series was funded by Seirbheis nam Meadhanan Gàidhlig and originally produced in the Gaelic language by SMG TV Productions. Its title, 'Iomall nan Tonn' - 'The Edge of the Waves' - is beautifully appropriate.

  • Isle of Skye and The Small Isles (Muck, Eigg, Rum, Sanday, Canna)
  • The Orkney Isles
  • Islay, Jura, Colonsay and Gigha
  • The Shetland Islands
  • Mull, Iona, Coll and Tiree
  • The Western Isles

[edit] Isle of Skye and The Small Isles

Skye or the Isle of Skye (Scottish Gaelic An t-Eilean Sgitheanach), is the largest and most northerly island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. The island's peninsulas radiate out from a mountainous centre dominated by the Cuillin hills. Although it has been suggested that the Gaelic name describes this shape there is no definitive agreement as to its origins.

The island has been occupied since the Mesolithic and has a colourful history including a time of Norse rule and a long period of domination by clans Leod and Donald. The events of the 19th century had a devastating impact on the human population, which today numbers around 9,200. In contrast to many other Scottish islands this represents a 4% increase from the census of 1991.The residents are augmented in the summer by large numbers of tourists and visitors. The main industries are tourism, agriculture, fishing and whisky-distilling. The largest settlement is Portree, which is known for its picturesque harbour. Just over 30% of the residents on Skye speak Gaelic.

[edit] The Orkney Isles

Orkney (also known as the Orkney Islands or, incorrectly, the Orkneys) is an archipelago in northern Scotland, situated 10 miles (16 km) north of the coast of Caithness. Orkney comprises over 70 islands; around 20 are inhabited. The largest island, known as "Mainland," has an area of 202 sq mi (523 km²), making it the sixth-largest Scottish island and the tenth-largest island in the British Isles. The largest settlement and administrative centre is Kirkwall.

Orkney has been inhabited for at least 5,500 years. Originally inhabited by neolithic tribes and then by the Picts, Orkney was invaded and finally annexed by Norway in 875 and settled by the Norse. It was subsequently re-annexed to the Scottish Crown in 1472, following the failed payment of a dowry for James III's bride, Margaret of Denmark.

Orkney contains some of the oldest and best-preserved Neolithic sites in Europe, and the "Heart of Neolithic Orkney" is a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site.

[edit] Islay, Jura, Colonsay and Gigha

Islay ( Scottish Gaelic: Ìle), a Scottish island, known as "The Queen of the Hebrides" (Banrìgh nan Eilean), is the southernmost island of the Inner Hebrides. It lies in Argyll just to the west of Jura and around 25 miles (40 km) north of the Irish coast, which can be seen on a clear day. The island's capital is Bowmore, famous for its distillery and distinctive round Kilarrow Parish Church. Port Ellen is the largest settlement.

Islay is the fifth largest Scottish island and the sixth largest island surrounding Britain.

The island is home to many bird species and is a popular destination throughout the year with bird watchers, notably in February to see a large colony of barnacle geese. Resident birds include chough, hen harrier, sea eagle, oystercatcher, cormorant and many wading birds.

[edit] The Shetland Islands

The Shetland Islands comprisies more than a hundred islands, just 15 of them inhabited, span the hundred miles (145km) between Fair Isle and Out Stack, the northernmost point of Britain.

This bustling archipelago of 22,500 people boasts abundant wildlife, a spectacular coastline and dozens of major archaeological sites. The 567 sq. mile (1468km²) county of Shetland is an entrancing mixture of Scotland and Norway.

[edit] Mull, Iona, Coll and Tiree

The Isle of Mull or simply Mull (Scottish Gaelic Muile) is the second largest island of the Inner Hebrides, off the west coast of Scotland in the council area of Argyll and Bute.

With an area of 875.35 square kilometres (337.97 sq mi) Mull is the fourth largest Scottish island and the fourth largest island surrounding Great Britain. In the 2001 census the usual resident population of Mull was 2,667; in the summer this is supplemented by many more tourists. Much of the population lives in Tobermory, the only burgh on the island until 1973, and its capital.

The island is home to over 250 different bird species including the White-tailed Eagle, which was reintroduced in the nearby Island of Rùm and migrated to Mull, where it now has a stronghold. Minke whales, porpoises and dolphins are among the sea life that can be seen on boat tours from Mull.

[edit] The Western Isles

The Outer Hebrides, (officially known for local government purposes by the Gaelic name, Na h-Eileanan Siar) comprise an island chain off the west coast of Scotland. The local government area is one of the 32 unitary council areas of Scotland.

The island chain forms part of the Hebrides, separated from the Scottish mainland and from the Inner Hebrides by the stormy waters of the Minch, the Little Minch and the Sea of the Hebrides. On the island chain Scottish Gaelic formerly was the dominant language, and remains widely spoken even though in some areas it has now been largely supplanted by English.

[edit] Screenshots

[edit] Technical Specs

Video Codec: XviD ISO MPEG-4
Video Bitrate: 1800 kbps
Video Resolution: 704x400
Video Aspect Ratio: 1.760:1
Audio Codec: AC3
Audio Bitrate: 192kb/s CBR 48000 Hz
Audio Languages: English/Scots Gaelic
RunTime : 25 mins
Part Size: 373 MB
Subtitles: NO
Ripped by: Dentje

[edit] Links

[edit] Release Post

[edit] Related Documentaries

[edit] ed2k Links

Added by Dentje
Personal tools