Prohibition

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[edit] General Information

History Documentary hosted by Peter Coyote and Ken Burns, published by PBS in 2011 - English narration

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Image: Prohibition-Cover.jpg

[edit] Information

PROHIBITION is a three-part, five-and-a-half-hour documentary film series directed by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick that tells the story of the rise, rule, and fall of the Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the entire era it encompassed.

The culmination of nearly a century of activism, Prohibition was intended to improve, even to ennoble, the lives of all Americans, to protect individuals, families, and society at large from the devastating effects of alcohol abuse.

But the enshrining of a faith-driven moral code in the Constitution paradoxically caused millions of Americans to rethink their definition of morality. Thugs became celebrities, responsible authority was rendered impotent. Social mores in place for a century were obliterated. Especially among the young, and most especially among young women, liquor consumption rocketed, propelling the rest of the culture with it: skirts shortened. Music heated up. America's Sweetheart morphed into The Vamp.

Prohibition turned law-abiding citizens into criminals, made a mockery of the justice system, caused illicit drinking to seem glamorous and fun, encouraged neighborhood gangs to become national crime syndicates, permitted government officials to bend and sometimes even break the law, and fostered cynicism and hypocrisy that corroded the social contract all across the country. With Prohibition in place, but ineffectively enforced, one observer noted, America had hardly freed itself from the scourge of alcohol abuse – instead, the "drys" had their law, while the "wets" had their liquor.

The story of Prohibition's rise and fall is a compelling saga that goes far beyond the oft-told tales of gangsters, rum runners, flappers, and speakeasies, to reveal a complicated and divided nation in the throes of momentous transformation. The film raises vital questions that are as relevant today as they were 100 years ago – about means and ends, individual rights and responsibilities, the proper role of government and finally, who is — and who is not — a real American.


[edit] Episode One - A Nation of Drunkards

Originally aired October 2, 2011

Americans have argued over alcohol for centuries. Since the early years of the American Republic, drinking has been at least as American as apple pie. As Episode 1: A Nation of Drunkards begins, clergymen, craftsmen and canal-diggers drink. So do the crowds of men who turn out for barn-raisings and baptisms, funerals, elections and public hangings. Tankards of cider are kept by farmhouses' front doors, and in many places alcohol is considered safer to drink than water. Alcohol, along with its attendant rituals and traditions, is embedded in the fabric of American culture.

[edit] Episode Two - A Nation of Scofflaws

Originally aired October 3, 2011

On January 16, 1920, the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution goes into effect, making it illegal to manufacture, transport or sell intoxicating liquor. Episode Two, A Nation of Scofflaws, examines the problems of enforcement, as millions of law-abiding Americans become lawbreakers overnight.

[edit] Episode Three - A Nation of Hyprocrites

Originally aired October 4, 2011

In the mid 1920s, an unprecedented winning streak continues on Wall Street, and it feels to many like the good times will go on forever. Americans during the Jazz Age, writes F. Scott Fitzgerald, are "a whole race gone hedonistic, deciding on pleasure." Prohibition, with its moralistic underpinnings, begins to feel anachronistic at best. In Episode 3, A Nation of Hypocrites, support for the law diminishes as the playfulness of sneaking around for a drink gives way to disenchantment with its glaring unintended consequences.

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[edit] Technical Specs

  • Video Codec: x264
  • Video Bitrate: ~2537 kbps
  • Video Aspect Ratio: 1.778:1
  • Video Resolution: 1280x720
  • Audio Codec: HE-AAC
  • Audio Bitrate: ~155 kbps VBR 48/24 KHz
  • Audio Channels: 6
  • Run-Time: ~1:45:00
  • Framerate: 29.97 fps
  • Size: ~2.2GB each
  • Source: 1080i OTA ATSC
  • Encoded by: joeyjoejoe


Technical Specs for DVD XviD

  • Video Codec: XviD ISO MPEG-4
  • Video Bitrate: 1400 kbps
  • Video Resolution: 720 x 400
  • Video Aspect Ratio: 1.800 (16:9)
  • Frames Per Second: 29
  • Audio Codec: 0x2000 (Dolby AC3)
  • Audio Bitrate: 192 kb/s AC3 48000 Hz
  • Audio Streams: 2
  • Audio Languages: English
  • RunTime Per Part: 94.Mins
  • Number Of Parts: 1
  • Part Size: 1.05 GB (1,079 MB)
  • Encoded by Harry65
  • Source: DVD

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